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Unplugged from The Matrix: Being Alive in Reality

the_matrixThis past couple years I’ve unplugged from the Matrix. Unlike the popular movie, it hasn’t been so dramatic as joining an underground militia to start a human revolution against machines, but the plot is actually pretty similar.

If you’re somehow not familiar with the movie, the basic gist is that people in the future become slave-batteries, powering machines, and are kept subdued by having their brains tapped into and fed fake realities. It all seems real until you’re unplugged from the matrix and shown a much harsher, but ultimately freer reality; a reality in which you have choice. In my own life, I’ve started focusing on my problems, stopped drinking alcohol, started working on my spirituality, and started realizing that in everything—even how I feel—I have a choice.

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Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior (A Review)

Not knowing exactly what to write, I wanted to write a review to remind myself of the key points in this book and share something that is likely not on most people’s radars. Much of this book can’t be summarized or fully captured in a blog post, but I think the quote below gives you an idea of what you’ll find in here. The basic premise is that we need to fully accept what it means to be human, taking our “bad” with the good, and facing this fact—embracing our humanness—is an act of being a warrior. And actually it teaches to not think of things as “good” or “bad” in our nature, but merely as a state of being what we are. Once we can accept this, then we can begin to move forward in “uplifting our lives.”

A great deal of chaos in the world occurs because people don’t appreciate themselves. Having never developed sympathy or gentleness towards themselves, they cannot experience harmony or peace within themselves, and therefore, what they project to others is also inharmonious and confused. Instead of appreciating our lives, we often take our existence for granted or we find it depressing and burdensome. People threaten to commit suicide because they aren’t getting what they think they deserve out of life. They blackmail others with the threat of suicide, saying that they will kill themselves if certain things don’t change. Certainly we should take our lives seriously, but that doesn’t mean driving ourselves to the brink of disaster by complaining about our problems or holding a grudge against the world. We have to accept personal responsibility for uplifting our lives.

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